Archive for the 'linguistics' Category

letting it go

Had this quote on my mind this whole morning:

By letting it go it all gets done. The world is won by those who let it go. But when you try and try, the world is beyond the winning.

Laozi, Dao De Jing (translated by Raymond B Blakney)

MZ asked me if I knew the original text, so I googled, and found out it was Chapter 48:

第四十八章

为学日益,为道日损,损之又损,以至于无为。无为而无不为,取天下常以无事;及其有事,不足以取天下。

(The second sentence is the source material of ‘By letting it go…’.)

So I did more googling and found a whole bunch of Dao De Jing translations here, and the rest of Blakney’s translations here!

And his translation for Chapter 48:

The student learns by daily increment.
The Way is gained by daily loss,
Loss upon loss until
At last comes rest.

By letting go, it all gets done;
The world is won by those who let it go!
But when you try and try,
The world is then beyond the winning.

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millennium falcon

A producer called me and she said, “Hi Calista, I have some bad news. Harrison has been hurt, he had an accident. He was standing on a Millennium Falcon and the door fell. […] And I called a friend of mine and I said, “What the hell is the Millennium Falcon? I have never heard of that airline!”

Calista Flockhart, on the Jimmy Kimmel Live show

it’s perfectly fine to use the s-word

An enlightened view indeed! (Though the most ironic thing is that the paper itself censors the vulgarity in question!)

It’s perfectly fine to use the S-word
By Andy Chen

It is an inelegant word, but when used as an exclamation, it is to me neither rude nor an expletive

The teacher of one of my two daughters called me recently, to tell me my child had said a “bad” word in school.

Instantly, my mind went “Uh-oh”, although it was a lot less innocuous than that, so I could understand where or whom my daughter might have inadvertently picked up her vocabulary from.

Continue reading ‘it’s perfectly fine to use the s-word’

year of the rooster

This made me LOL a little:

 

As some readers told me, during this new year, we shouldn’t be cocky, but we shouldn’t be chicken either.

Good advice.

Calvin Cheng’s Facebook wall, 28 January 2017

you learn something new every day

And that’s an Oriental riff!

you learn something new every day

A pangram is a sentence using every letter of a certain alphabet at least once. (A list of interesting pangrams can be found here.)

电光石火

On Monday morning, I stood at the sink, brushing my teeth in a post-sleep haze. Suddenly, in a flash, everything fell into place, and I could finally properly count from one to hundred in Kristang!!! :D

you learn something new every day

Kraft paper is named thus because it is produced from chemical pulp produced in the kraft process. (Which in turn got its moniker from the German Kraft, meaning ‘strength’.) And I always thought it was some cute respelling of the word craft (since the paper is often used in crafts)!

you learn something new every day

An ailurophile is a cat lover! And the dog equivalent is cynophile!

learning a new language

Somehow it feels like all the words I’ve encountered are floating freely in the space of my mind, waiting to be tethered down into the right places with the laws of grammar…

keng bos?

Learning a new language is always…… painful. But now at least I can say, ‘Teng bong! Yo (name). Yo papiah Inggres, China, Singgres kon Kristang. Mutu grandi merseh!’

Translation: ‘How are you? I am (name). I speak English, Chinese and Kristang. Thank you very much!’ In Kristang, of course!

NB Title of this entry means ‘Who (are) you?’ Sophie’s World, a primer on Western philosophy, begins with the eponymous heroine opens her mailbox to find a note with the question ‘Who are you?’ I read that book when I was 14 and enjoyed it tremendously.

back to school

Rushing to NUS for a 9 am lesson and ending up being late (thankfully, a few others were even later than I was!) certainly brought back memories of the bad ol’ days. Reliving horrid history aside, my very first Kristang lesson this morning was a blast.

At one point, I asked the teacher Kevin if Kristang had any inflections, and he said no, which made it quite simple to learn (which means that it’s probably an analytic language). During the break, one middle-aged lady (who works at the university) told me she thought I was a teacher when she heard me ask about inflections. Haha!

We also played a number of fun games to reinforce the grammar. One was going over to another group to ask them what languages they spoke – all in simple Kristang, of course Our guest teacher, an elderly Eurasian called Mr Bernard Mesenas, commented that I was very serious during this activity, which was very good. :D

(And this is the first time I’m doing a ‘third’ language, not counting studying Japanese at the Ministry of Education Language Centre way back when I was in Secondary 1. The journey from the centre to home was long and tiring, and I gave up the ghost after four months of twice-weekly lessons.)

an endangered language

Way back in my previous life as an linguistics undergrad, I learnt about Kristang, a highly endangered creole spoken mainly by Eurasians of Portuguese descent in Singapore and Malaysia. (I am not one myself.) If I remember correctly, I had toyed with the idea of writing about the language for my ISM paper, but I obviously didn’t speak it nor know anyone who could. Eventually I focused on something else instead.

Last month, I came across this article (which was originally found here). The author, Melissa De Silva, mentioned that she’d been attending Kristang lessons conducted by undergrad Kevin Martens Wong, and best of all, the second round of classes would be starting soon! What an incredible opportunity! Naturally I emailed Kevin to sign up.

Yesterday, Kevin sent all of us an extremely comprehensive email to ‘clear up outstanding administrative matters, and to provide you with details about getting to class and what to bring’. (Word informed me that it was actually 3489 words – much longer than most of the essays I had to write in university! LOL.) Reading it made me quite excited but also a little worried cos I left school eons ago. In her article, Melissa noted that Kevin ‘basically learned Kristang on his own by reading up (and memorising!) the scant available material on the language, such as dictionaries and books and poetry collections written by … Joan Marbeck’, so I’m hoping it won’t be too difficult.

Now, I’m counting down the days to my very first lesson!!! :D

you learn something new every day

Just read my friend G’s blog post on alternatives for national service, where I learnt the term ‘cheese-eating surrender monkeys’, used primarily to insult the French.

you learn something new every day

To end on a high note, a great speech should have a great peroration!


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