Archive for the 'quoteworthy' Category

year of the rooster

This made me LOL a little:

 

As some readers told me, during this new year, we shouldn’t be cocky, but we shouldn’t be chicken either.

Good advice.

Calvin Cheng’s Facebook wall, 28 January 2017

re-employment a zero-sum game?

Re-employment a zero-sum game?
While it is laudable that we extend the re-employment age of older workers, we need to consider its impact on those entering the job market and those who have a young family to support or who have recently been retrenched (“The new age of re-employment”; Jan 13).

The Singapore labour market is finite in size. Every place an elderly worker continues to occupy in a company is one place less for younger folk seeking a job.

At the middle and higher hierarchy of the management, there is a need for fresh leaders to move up. Mandatory retention of older folk limits the mobility of fresh talents and, eventually, harms everybody in the company and, by extension, the economy as a whole.

While the Government has a social responsibility to provide meaningful occupation for those above 60, it has an equally heavy responsibility, if not heavier, to ensure that our young are not left out in the cold.

Our talent pool is small; we need to secure the brightest and provide upward mobility for the deserving.

The young, when gainfully employed, can look after the old (an Asian value), but the reverse is not socially acceptable or practical.

Lim Soon Heng

Straits Times Forum page, 14 January 2017

how much for the festive spirit?

As a person who likes to pick perfect presents, this article struck a chord with me……

 

How much for the festive spirit?
By Akshita Nanda

Let’s be honest: We’re all judging one another by how much we give and what we receive

‘Tis the season to be judged on your giving. Colour drains from wallet and brain in the face of yet another annual round of Secret Santa parties and gift exchanges with loved ones.

Walk into a mall and be further pierced by the eyes of fund-raisers in reindeer antlers. Their gazes narrow on my shopping bags, their teeth set in fixed grins. My steps falter.

Continue reading ‘how much for the festive spirit?’

chance

I love to think about chance – about how one little overheard word, one pebble in a shoe, can change the universe.

Anne Tyler, American writer

friendship

The true friend is the one that’s coming in the door while everyone else is going out.

Dr Phil McGraw, American TV personality

many happy returns for lost and found

Was clearing more stuff just now, as part of Operation Clean Room, when I found a Straits Times reprint of the following article (dated 10 December 1999)……

Many Happy Returns for Lost and Found
Culture: Tokyo center relies on honor, public shame to help owners get items back.
By Mark Magnier

TOKYO — This is where it all ends up, everything from bowling balls and crooked dentures to purses, cell phones and umbrellas. Welcome to the Tokyo Metropolitan Lost and Found, a veritable monument to the misplaced, the abandoned, the rejected.

Drop something in a public restroom or in a subway corridor in Tokyo and there’s a good chance you’ll get it back, here in one of the most honest nations on Earth, even if you don’t necessarily want it. And like so much else in Japan, the lost-and-found system is traditional, very well organized and rigorously maintained.

Continue reading ‘many happy returns for lost and found’

sun and moon

Everybody has a little bit of the sun and moon in them. Everybody has a little bit of man, woman, and animal in them. Darks and lights in them. Everyone is part of a connected cosmic system. Part earth and sea, wind and fire, with some salt and dust swimming in them. We have a universe within ourselves that mimics the universe outside. None of us are just black or white, or never wrong or always right. No one. No one person exists without polarities. Everybody has good and bad forces working with them, against them, and within them. This is why we have to learn to accept everybody’s multi-dimensionalism as the new fundamentalism. The same way you love your mother with all her faults is the same way we are supposed to love our sisters and brothers — with all their faults in them. For instance, some say I’m polite and kind but can have a wicked temper in an instant. Nothing is created perfect – unless it is artificially engineered to be. Everybody has several sides to their being that make up who they are. These different facets shift and change depending on mood, experience, social situation, weather, political climate, state of mind, financial state, or environment. People can seem like two or more different people at different parts of the same day. Nobody was created to be one dimensional. We were all born as multi-dimensional beings. Part sun and part moon.

Suzy Kassem

free from tyranny of choice

This article is essentially about #firstworldproblems!

Free from tyranny of choice
By Gary Hayden

I dislike having too many choices.

I find that the more choices I am given, the less enthusiastic I feel about them.

Continue reading ‘free from tyranny of choice’

a metaphor for our turbulent times

“I wish it need not have happened in my time,” said Frodo.

“So do I,” said Gandalf, “and so do all who live to see such times. But that is not for them to decide. All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.”

JRR Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

enlightenment

If you’re not a liberal when you’re 25, you have no heart. If you’re not a conservative by the time you’re 35, you have no brain.

Anonymous

I used to support liberals and their causes until I realized that most of them did not care for others’ freedom of speech. Henceforth I saw the light, defected to the other side and am now a happy conservative, LOL. :P

What a difference the passage of ten years and the transition from university to working life make!

(Though I’m not really a conservative now actually!)

you learn something new every day

Chinese translator of Don Quixote dies at 105

BEIJING • Chinese playwright, author and translator Yang Jiang died yesterday at the age of 105, the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences told Xinhua news agency.

Madam Yang was fluent in English, French and Spanish, and her translations of classics such as Don Quixote and French picaresque novel Gil Blas remain the definitive versions for Chinese readers.

Born Yang Jikang in Beijing, Madam Yang studied at Soochow University and then Tsinghua University in the 1930s. She was married to Mr Qian Zhongshu, well-known for his novel Fortress Besieged that depicted the lives of Chinese intellectuals in the 1930s. Mr Qian died in 1997.

Madam Yang’s death was the top search term on the Chinese microblogging site Weibo yesterday, Associated Press reported.

The Straits Times, 26 May 2016

Read the following brief and misread ‘picaresque novel‘ as ‘picturesque novel’ at first, and wondered what kind of book it was. Did a double take and realized it was a totally different word!

dogs, cats and birds

birds

from here

Dogs come when they are called.

Cats take a message and get back to you later.

Birds shred the message and poop on it.

Truer words were never spoken!

thoughts to live (and dress) by

I have never known a really chic woman whose appearance was not, in large part, an outward reflection of her inner self.

Mainbocher (1890 – 1976), American couturier

on co-operation

How to Co-operate

People are drawn together because some tasks are too big for one person. They say too many cooks spoil the broth, but they also say many hands make light work. The trick is having one person work on the soup and the rest on the electrics.

This was extracted from How to Be Normal by Guy Browning, which is a collection of short essays all titled ‘How to (Do Something)’. I didn’t really get its humour at all, and made myself finish it anyway. I thought the above snippet was the funniest part of the book! :P

losing kampung culture is part of progress

I thought this letter was a pretty interesting perspective on the ‘over-regulation’ of void deck usage.

 

Losing kampung culture is part of progress

The functions of our void decks are evolving, but this is not necessarily a bad thing (“Voiding the kampung spirit?“; March 17).

These changes occur due to the country’s progress, which alters people’s demand of their living environment.

Fifty years ago, the kampung lifestyle was an essential part of the then Third World Singapore. Fast forward 50 years, and our country has evolved to become a world economic hub.

Continue reading ‘losing kampung culture is part of progress’


wordpress visitor counter